Recent Posts

Review: The Infinite Tides by Christian Kiefer

The gifted Keith Corcoran has spent his life working towards the dream of becoming an astronaut.  With a skill for mathematics, many years of dedicated training, and the support of a loving family, Keith at last succeeds.  His life’s effort culminates in a six-month mission aboard the International Space Station.  Tragically, in the middle of […]

In search of narcissism in literature

Springing from a bottomless place, narcissism uses fear, conceit, and cruelty to satisfy its consuming, and ultimately futile, desire to be filled. Narcissism is a false way of being in the world, and the narcissist is the ultimate pretender, a fancy scarecrow, stuffed not with straw, but with duplicity, deception, self-delusion. As characters, narcissists possess an abundance of flaws and are, therefore, abundantly interesting.

Review of Sincerely, curated by Marieke Hardy and Michaela McGuire

Though the entries in this collection were first performed at the Women of Letters salon events, nothing is lost in the written word. In fact, the individual voices of the authors shine through, sometimes lighthearted and whimsical, sometimes poignant and nostalgic. Sincerely is a potent tribute to an art that is shown to be not only a lot of fun but also very much alive.

Every Love Story Is A Ghost Story: A Life of David Foster Wallace

Max’s biography of Wallace does credit to his subject. He never met Wallace. Like me, the closest he got was a literary party in New York in the ’90s. But one senses he knew Wallace the way I felt I knew him. Every Love Story Is A Ghost Story is a tightly packed, straightforward account of one writer’s life, but it has something to say to all writers.

In Search of Literary Figures Based on Real-Life People

“Writers are often told to write what they know, so it should come as no surprise that many of the most famous characters in literary history are based on real people. Whether drawing inspiration from their spouses, friends and family, or finally, after decades worth of work, inserting themselves into the text, authors pull nearly every word and sentence from some element of reality, and most often, that element is people. “